Ryan Hagerty Captures His First WSOP Bracelet in Event #23, $500 Turbo No-Limit Hold’em

Shannon Shorr Wins Event #1 in 2021 Poker Masters

Ryan Hagerty & Shannon Shorr

In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee interviews two recent winners. First, Bernard interviews 2021 WSOP.com bracelet winner, Ryan Hagerty. Then, Bernard interviews 2021 Poker Masters Event #1 champion, Shannon Shorr.

In the first half of the show, Bernard interviews Ryan Hagerty, who recently captured his first WSOP bracelet, winning the Event #23, $500 No-Limit Turbo event. The event had 694 entries and Ryan took home $67,207. He compares winning his first WSOP bracelet with the 2020 WSOP US bracket final table, where he finished in 4th place. Ryan describes the WSOP bracelet event, including the turbo aspect of the tournament and the heads-up battle. Finally, Ryan talks about his future plans in the next few months including GGPoker, the WSOP PA, WPT at Maryland Live, and the 2021 WSOP at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino.

In the second half of the show, Bernard interviews Shannon Shorr, who captured his first Poker Masters Tournament, Event #1, which had 82 entries, earning him $205,000. Initially, Shannon talks about playing in the Poker Masters High Roller events, including the need to always pay attention while playing. He discusses the opportunity he had to learn while playing the High Rollers events against some of the best players in the world. Shannon reflects on how poker has changed over the last 15 years, and how he has evolved. Shannon discusses the bubble and the final table of Event #1 of the 2021 Poker Masters. Finally, Shannon talks about how he spent time during COVID 19 pandemic, including playing online poker.

0:00Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show. This week’s guests are Ryan Hagerty, 2021 WSOP.com Bracelet winner & Shannon Shorr, 2021 Poker Masters Event #1 Champion.
7:15RunGood Gear Ad
7:58Bernard welcomes Ryan Hagerty to the show.
9:26Ryan joins the show and compares winning his first WSOP bracelet with the 2020 WSOP US bracket final table, where he finished in 4th place.
13:51Ryan describes the WSOP bracelet event, including the turbo aspect of the tournament.
19:20Ryan recalls heads-up play during the bracelet win.
25:20Ryan talks about his future plans in the next few months, including GGPoker, WSOP PA, WPT at Maryland Live, and the 2021 WSOP at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino.
30:33Share My Pair Ad
31:05Bernard welcomes Shannon Shorr to the show.
32:05Shannon joins the show and talks about playing in the Poker Masters High Roller events, including the need to always pay attention while playing.
37:01Shannon discusses the opportunity to learn while playing the High Rollers events against some of the best players in the world.
40:18Shannon reflects on how poker has changed over the last 15 years and how he has evolved as a player.
44:28Shannon discusses the bubble and final table of Event #1 of the 2021 Poker Masters.
50:19Shannon talks about how he spent time during COVID 19 pandemic, including playing online poker.

Ryan Hagerty and Shannon Shorr

As poker players, we were all likely introduced to card games of some form as kids — Go Fish, Crazy Eights, and Uno to name a few — and they all had something in common: there were no solvers available for them!

Kidding aside, one trait most kids card games do share is the fact that discarding and drawing play a big role. Several of the best poker games today share these traits as well.

“Got any 4’s?” “Nope, go fish!”

Got 4 cards to a wheel in 2-7 Triple Draw? Go fish!

Draw games are some of the most fun poker variants you’ll find in a mixed game, so let’s go through them and get you ready to relive the excitement of drawing from the ol’ Uno deck.

In this section of our Mixed Games Poker Guide, we’ll be covering the classic variants of 2-7 Triple Draw, A-5 Triple Draw, 5-Card Draw, and Badugi, as well as some variations that have evolved in the wider mixed games collective like Badacey, Badeucey, and Archie.

Draw Games

Also, be sure to check out our other Mixed Games Poker Guide articles on Flop Games and Stud Games.

THE CLASSICS

2-7 Triple Draw

Limit 2-7 Triple Draw

Let’s start with the most popular and common version of draw, and also one of the most popular games overall in a mix, as it is action packed and can play significantly bigger than other games in the rotation (especially when played as pot limit or in rare appearances no limit, but for our purposes here, we’ll focus on limit).

In 2-7 Triple Draw, the goal is to make the best five-card low hand without making a straight or flush (aces play high), so 23457 (known as a wheel or number 1) is the best possible hand.

Players are dealt five cards face-down with a button and two blinds in play. Pre-draw betting begins to the left of the blinds, as in flop games, where players can fold, call, or raise. At the completion of betting, players must then decide which of their cards to discard and subsequently draw new cards in hopes of improving their hand, beginning with the blinds.

Action continues with two more rounds of betting and drawing, followed by a final round of betting, with the lowest hand following the third draw declared the winner. At any point in the hand, a player can ‘stand pat’ and no longer draw if they feel their hand needs no further improvement (or if they wish to ‘snow’, or bluff).

As mentioned, this version of the game is played with a limit betting structure, so in a $10-20 game, the betting increments pre-draw and after the first draw are $10. After the second and third draw, they increase to $20.

Limit 2-7 Triple Draw Tip: Don’t leave home without a deuce

There is a lot of strategy involved in playing Triple Draw well, and many ways you can get in trouble in a hand. Check out the Learning Resources section of our Mixed Games Poker Guide for a deeper dive into this and all the mixed games we discuss.

As with all poker games, starting hand selection is a large part of playing Triple Draw well, and arguably the most important and powerful starting card to hold in any poker game is the deuce in 2-7 Triple Draw. Without it, you literally can not make one of the strongest possible hands. The best hand you can make is 86543, which is the 9th best possible hand. You can also run into more possibilities of making straights, and if you don’t have a deuce, your opponents likely do, which will make drawing to a deuce more difficult if that’s what you’re hoping to do.

If you are dealt a pat 8 to begin with, you should keep it and play it aggressively as opposed to breaking (discarding) and drawing to a 7, but if you don’t have that deuce when you are drawing, you’ll be making life more difficult than it should be.

A-5 Triple Draw

Limit A-5 Triple Draw

Though a much rarer variant in the realm of draw games, A-5 triple draw is nearly identical to its 2-7 cousin, with identical deal, betting and drawing structures. However, hand strengths are the key difference, as straights and flushes no longer count against you, so A2345 is now the best possible hand (hence the name).

As such, strategies change significantly with seemingly more possibilities to make hands, and one card (the deuce), not having the power it did when straights counted against you.

Limit A-5 Triple Draw Tip: Pat 8’s ain’t what they used to be

As mentioned earlier, in 2-7 Triple Draw, a pat 8 is a decently strong starting hand, and should be patted and played aggressively. However, in A-5, with a 7 no longer being the lowest possible made hand, the value of a pat 8 diminishes significantly. There are many more opportunities to break your hand and draw to improve.

For example, if you are dealt 8642A to start, you’re better off discarding the 8 and drawing to improve. You have three draws to catch a 3 or 5 to make a very strong 6, or you could catch a 7 to improve to a ‘pattable’ 7642A. Once you’ve made a 7, it’s usually best to pat it and play aggressively against opponents still drawing to force them to pay to outdraw you.

2-7 Single Draw

No Limit 2-7 Single Draw

No Limit 2-7 (a.k.a., “Kansas City Lowball”) is seen by many poker players as the most ‘true’ form of poker. A hand is dealt identically to the triple draw games above (straights and flushes count against you, too, as in 2-7 triple draw), but two big changes make the game drastically different, and they’re right there in the name of the game: No limit betting, and one draw.

With only two betting rounds (pre- and post-draw), the amount of information a player can gather from their opponent is very limited. You get information from their pre-draw action, the number of cards they draw, and their post-draw action. That’s it. Oh, and one more thing…

Live. Reads.

Hence why this variant is seen as such a pure form of poker. In the live version of the game, there may be no other variant where knowing your opponent and picking up a live tell is as important. Looking your opponent in the eye and determining whether they’ve got it or not is a big part of No Limit Deuce, and its why you’ll see the best players in the world succeeding at the game.

There are online games available, and they are fun (ultimately NL 2-7 is just a really fun game), but they’re just not the same without the live element of reading your opponent.

Don’t be afraid though if you’re reading skills aren’t among the elite. Bet sizing, timing tells, and pot odds all still huge elements of being a successful NL 2-7 player. And did I mention it’s a lot of fun?

No Limit 2-7 Single Draw Tip: A pat Jack is a favorite over any 1 card draw

When it comes to strategy, there is a lot to such a simple game. With only the one draw, hand strengths change drastically from triple draw games. Knowing your opponents and their hand ranges is key, but one rule stands above all others and it’s pretty simple: A pat Jack is a favorite over ANY 1 card draw.

The pat Jack is the line. No matter how strong your opponent is drawing, the fact that they’re drawing makes their hand inferior. If you have the roughest Jack possible (JT986), it’s still a favorite to win against even the strongest of one card draws.

Position is as always a huge positive, but in a situation where you may have played your made Jack aggressively and gone to the draw against an opponent who is out of position, you’ll know exactly what to do against them.

5-Card Draw

5-Card Draw

Prior to the poker boom, if there was a draw poker game you grew up playing, it was likely 5-Card Draw. Nowadays, the game is virtually impossible to find save for mixed cash games, WSOP Dealers Choice or Big Bet Mix events, and a spattering of online offerings.

Action is dealt identically to the above games, however in this game you want to make the best hand, using the standard rank of hands. 5-Card Draw can be played as a limit triple draw game, but is best and most commonly played as either a pot limit or no limit game with one draw.

5-Card Draw Tip: Know your draws

Deception is not as prominent a part of 5-Card Draw as it can be with other draw games, which is frankly a large part of its lack of popularity. It’s really a pretty simple game. Both your and your opponents pre-draw hand strength will be quite apparent to observant players, and as such, you’ll need to be observant to how both they and you draw.

A player drawing one card obviously has either two pair, four to the straight or flush, or in very rare cases, four-of-a-kind.

If drawing two, an opponent has either three-of-a-kind, a pair with a high card (not recommended – draw three when holding a pair for the best chance at making three-of-a-kind), or in some cases a two-card draw to a straight or flush (just don’t).

Three-card draws are almost always a pair unless a player in the blinds gets the opportunity to draw cheaply with two high cards.

Four- and five-card draws you should only see from the big blind. If you notice a player acting otherwise, don’t let them leave the game!

Badugi

Badugi

Badugi is one of the most unique draw games and, as you’ll see shortly, the perfect addition to some of the exciting split-pot draw game variations coming up! It is played as a lowball game where the lowest four-card hand wins, but in this game, you also must try to make your hand unsuited (known as a Badugi), so A234 of all four suits is the best possible hand (straights do not count against you but flushes obviously do).

The game is dealt similarly to the above games, with a button and two blinds, but players are dealt only four cards face-down before any of the drawing rounds. Badugi is played as a triple draw game, but can be played limit, pot limit or no limit, with limit and pot limit the most common.

As with the other triple draw games, there is a round of betting before the first draw and after each of the three draws, before a winner is declared at showdown unless all other players fold.

The goal is ultimately to make a Badugi (any Badugi, even KQJT beats an incomplete Badugi), but in many cases that doesn’t happen, in which case the lowest three-card incomplete Badugi hand wins at showdown. For example, Ah2d3s3d would be the nut 3-card Badugi (the 3d does not play), and beats any other incomplete hand, which leads us to our strategy tip…

Badugi Tip: Start from the bottom and work your way up

As it is not a given that you’ll make a Badugi once the three draws have been completed, having the potential of a superior three-card hand as a backup versus an opponent also drawing is key.

For example, if your opponent starts with Td 2s Ah 6h, the lowest possible Badugi they can make on one draw is a 10, if they discard the 6h. Conceivably they could draw a low club, say 4c and have the option to break the 10 and draw to the 4 (if there are more draws to come), but Badugis are hard to make, so it’s better to just make a good one in the first place by starting with multiple low cards, than be starting by trying to make a bad or marginal Badugi.

If you start with say 5c 4h 2d Kd, sure you could draw the Ks giving you a bad Badugi, but you’re also live to multiple low spades that could give you a nearly unbeatable Badugi.

Also, playing in position is huge in Badugi. If you do make an ugly Badugi, at least you have the option in position to pat it if your opponent draws in front of you, knowing that at least it is ahead. If you’re out of position with a marginal Badugi, you’ll be hard pressed to know if it’s good vs. a late position opponent patting.

THE VARIANTS

Badacey

Badacey / Badeucey

What’s better than playing a draw game? Playing two of them simultaneously in a split-pot game! Badacey and Badeucey are a little tough to find if you’re not near a casino that spreads a regular mixed game, as there are no online offerings of it, but if you can find one, jump in and make sure the Badacey and Baduecey plaques are in the mix because they’re both great games, with a lot of similarities, but enough differences to give each its individual flair.

Both are spread as 5-card triple draw games, usually limit, and usually capped at 6-handed because of the number of cards in play and discarded.

The key differences are that Badacey is played as a Badugi / A-5 split, while Baduecey is a Badugi / 2-7 split. Strategies vary accordingly as, along with the best 4-card Badugi hand, players will be trying to also make the best 5-card A-5 or 2-7 hand to scoop both halves of the pot. In Badacey, since straights do not count against you with A-5 rules, a standard A234 Badugi would be the best possible. However, in Baduecey, aces play high and straights count against you as with 2-7 rules, so 2345 would be the best possible Badugi.

Badeucey

Badacey / Baduecey Tip: How low should you go?

Let’s start with what you should look for in a Badugi hand. As we discussed in our Badugi section above, it’s better to start as low as possible when drawing to a Badugi. This is doubly important in these games as, since you will be dealt five cards instead of four, a quality Badugi will be easier to make. Therefore it is critical if you aim to scoop both sides of the pot that you take advantage of this fact, and start with at least three low cards that can make both a premium Badugi hand AND a A-5 or 2-7 hand. Start with the basis for a good Badugi that can also easily improve to at least a decent lowball hand as well, whether it’s A-5 or 2-7.

As for how low you should go? A decent guideline is to aim for a 7 Badugi and a 7 low A-5 hand in Badacey. In Baduecey, you can try to go a little higher aiming for a 7 or 8 Badugi, with an 8 low 2-7 being strong. That said, depending on how your opponents play, you can loosen these standards if you see them regularly showing down higher hands than these.

Bonus Tip: Hammer your dealt pat hands or keep it super friendly

Sometimes you will be dealt an extremely strong one-way hand that is the virtual nuts for half the pot but needs improvement for the other half (e.g., 7h5h4h3h2c in Baduecey. You have a wheel which can not be beat, but only two usable Badugi cards). In these cases, pat your hand and either: A) Do your best to thin the field to scoop by forcing your opponents all to fold, or B) in a super loose splashy game, build the pot as best you can while freerolling multiple opponents to showdown, and make a decent profit from your half of the pot. On rare occasions you may get quartered if an opponent also makes a wheel, but quarterings are far less frequent in these games than in Omaha 8 or Better.

Archie

Archie

Archie is one of the rarest and most complex draw games, though it has grown in popularity on the Las Vegas mixed game scene for just that reason. It’s a lot of fun, but it can be a complex game with a lot of nuance and definitely favors more experienced mixed game players. So, if you’re new to this game, be careful as there can be a lot of seemingly enticing situations that can get you in trouble.

Archie is basically 5-card triple draw high/low split with qualifiers. Half the pot goes to the highest hand, half goes to the lowest A-5 hand. Of note, you must qualify your hand to be eligible for any part of the pot. For a qualifying low hand, you must make an 8 low or better. For a qualifying high hand, you must make either a pair of 6’s or a pair of 9’s (rules vary from room to room).

If there is no qualifying low hand at showdown, the entire pot is awarded to the highest hand. If there is no qualifying high hand, the pot is scooped by the lowest hand.

Quite often the pot will be split, as players will often be dealt strong one-way hands or draws and play solely for that half of the pot in a multiway situation. As with any split pot game though, our goal is to scoop the whole pot yourself! It will be tough to do that, but here’s a tip on how to do just that!

Archie Tip: Low hands with high potential are premiums for a scoop, or at least a strong chance at half

Barring a rare occasion where you are just dealt the nuts both ways, you’ll likely need to improve in some aspect to scoop a pot. Four low straight cards or four low suited cards are the premiums in this aspect.

If you are dealt 2356J, for example, you’ll be discarding the Jack and drawing one with plenty of opportunity to make either a strong low with an ace, 7 or 8 (which will likely win you half the pot), or there are those four 4’s out there that could scoop you the entire pot.

Four low suited cards are a similarly huge starter with possibilities to make a strong high (with a 9 or higher flush) a strong low (with an offsuit non-pairing card that gives you five cards 8 or lower), or a potential scooper (with a fifth flush card 8 or lower).

As mentioned in the Badacey /Baduecey section above, once you’ve made a hand, it’s up to you to determine whether you want to protect your hand and/or fold out opponents by raising aggressively, or building the pot by keeping others in if you’re resigned to playing for half.

Remember when you were a kid and all you wanted to eat was pizza (or burgers, or hot dogs, or candy, or whatever your favorite food was) and your parents said “NO!”?

Pizza’s great and all, as is No Limit Hold ‘em, but remember also how your parents encouraged you to try new foods?

Well, we’re here to be your “poker parent” and encourage you to try something new, like Brussels sprouts (sorry Limit Hold ‘em, that’s you).

Mixed games are the smorgasbord of poker, with a variety of recipes and tastes. Some are sweet, some are salty (or will make you a bit salty), but ultimately, they’re a whole new exciting world of flavors beyond the same old pizza, and it’s a ton of fun to discover them!

Please don’t be the kid who said they didn’t like something without even trying it. Be the kid who tried a spoonful of something and was pleasantly surprised by what they’d just tasted and discovered a new favorite food.

In this overview article, we’re going to give you a few spoonfuls of info and strategy about a wide variety of mixed games. Most importantly though, we’re going to give you a ton of reasons why you should give them a try (with far fewer food references).

Mixed Games

Also, be sure to check out the other three parts of this Mixed Games Poker Guide on Flop Games, Stud Games and Draw Games.

The Recipe (why mixed games are great)

As longtime lovers of mixed games, we can think of a plethora of reasons why they’re great. At the end of the day, you just need to experience a proper one for yourself, like the ones that’ll be running at the upcoming Cardplayer Lifestyle Mixed Game Festival. In the meantime, we’ve thought of eight great reasons why you’ll enjoy mixed games.

Friendly, welcoming players

The main reason we’ve heard players mention as to why they’re hesitant to try mixed games is the fear of looking foolish to other players because they may not know the games as well. From our experience, this is almost universally an unjustified fear. Players in mixed games are among the most welcoming and encouraging players in poker. If you tell them that you’re new to mixed games, they’re far more likely to welcome you and help you learn the game than to take advantage of your inexperience. The more people playing mixed games, the better it is for everyone, so it naturally lends itself to a supremely welcoming atmosphere.

Notably, the friendliness holds true for both low and high stakes games, though we recommend you start our on the lower rungs of the ladder to better get acquainted with all the different poker variants.

It’s a great change of pace

They say variety is the spice of life, and we passionately believe that holds true with poker. If you’re getting fatigued by playing just No Limit Hold ‘em, mixing it up with something new is a great way to recharge the poker batteries. NLHE can still be your bread and butter, but learning a new game (or two, or eight, or 20…) can be just what the doctor ordered to prevent poker burnout.

You may discover a new favorite

If you’ve never played before and get a taste of a variety of new games, you may just discover one or two that you love and want to learn more about and play more often!

Many players who first explore beyond Hold ‘em tend to dabble in Omaha 8 or Better and the stud variants in a HORSE rotation (Hold ‘em, Omaha 8, Razz, Stud, and Stud 8 or Better). Perhaps at that point you’ll be ready to dip your toes into draw games for the first time, such as the very popular 2-7 Triple Draw or more niche Badugi variants. With so many games to choose from, we’re willing to wager that Hold’em won’t be your favorite for too much longer.

It’s tough to really go broke

With most of the games in a dealer’s choice mix being limit structure or capped in big bet games, it’s tough to really get wrecked in a game like you can in a rough session of No Limit Hold em or Pot Limit Omaha (which is played with a cap in a mixed cash game).

If you’re just breaking into mixed games, yes there will be a learning curve. However, if you do a bit of homework beforehand you’ll be more likely to be competitive. Even on days when you “pay for experience” in a session, the hit will be much less painful to your bankroll (provided you learn at stakes you’re comfortable with).

Moreover, on a hand-to-hand basis, without really big bets relative to the pot as an option, the sting of flicking in a tough call is significantly less pressure-filled, which lends itself to less overall stress among the players, in turn leading to a more positive atmosphere at the table.

This relaxed vibe also leads to another great feature of mixed games…

No tanking!

Again, with limit or capped betting, those big decisions that warrant a really deep think are just so few and far between in a mixed game setting. Sure, there will be spots where players have a tough decision to make and put in some thought, but there is virtually never an occasion (especially in the limit games), where a player takes significant time to flick in a call or muck their cards.

Chips fly, decisions get made, and play moves much more quickly in mixed games, which is another major reason why players tend to generally be much happier and easygoing at a mixed game table.

Mixed games will help your No Limit Hold ‘em game

Whether it’s No Limit Hold ‘em, Pot Limit Omaha, 2-7 Triple Draw, 7-Card Stud, or even Razzdugi, they all fall under the umbrella of ‘poker’. There are general theories that apply to all, and there are nuances in different games that can help you with your No Limit Hold ‘em game. For instance:

Seeing poker in a different way, with some familiarities, will refresh your mind when you sit back down in your regular game. On the flip side, playing games that require completely new strategic considerations accomplish the same goal. Getting out of your comfort zone a bit and trying to figure out the best way to scoop an Archie pot will make what you already know about No Limit Hold ‘em seem simpler and more comfortable.

Bottom line, test driving a few new vehicles will increase your confidence with the “Cadillac of poker”.

You can spice up your home game

Introducing mixed games into your home game presents huge benefits.

If you want to try mixed games in the most comfortable environment possible, what better setting than with your group of friends at stakes you set? You can learn the games together or, once you personally become familiar with mixed games, you can spread the good word and introduce your friends to your new favorite poker variants.

Admittedly, it may be a bit of a challenge. My friends in my own home game were a bit tough to crack, as they wanted the familiarity of hanging out and playing NLHE sit and go’s. So, what I did along with that was suggest that for an hour I’d introduce two or three games to them, dealing and teaching, but not actually playing, so they wouldn’t be afraid of losing to me since I knew how to play them.

Within a couple of evenings, dealer’s choice cash games became a prominent part of my home game, as each player could pick their favorite game to put in the mix (which is a regular practice in casino-dealt mixed games as well).

It’s just plain fun

There are many reasons to give mixed games a try, but above all they’re just straight up fun.

The combination of the elements listed above form the recipe for a great time at a poker table. The most fun times I’ve had playing poker can all be pointed toward sessions of mixed games, whether it’s playing with old friends or making new friends.

A legendary night of $4/8 mix at the old Monte Carlo, and a night at the Westgate full of mixed games, massage bomb pots, and other shenanigans in Las Vegas still stand head and shoulders above all others when it comes to the best times I’ve had at a poker table.

And I lost both nights.

So, are you ready? Or at least curious yet? Let’s get you set and take a peek at what you’re in for.

What’s On the Menu (the many different games)

Flop games (Pot Limit Omaha, Omaha 8 or Better, PLO 8, Limit Omaha, Double Board Omaha, Big O, Short Deck, Courchevel, Drawmaha, S.H.O.P.)

These are the games that are dealt similarly to Hold ‘em. Players receive hole cards, there are blinds and/or antes, and a flop of community cards is dealt. These are games that will be most immediately familiar to Hold ‘em players, but there are many distinct differences.

Stud games (7-Card Stud, Razz, 7-Card Stud 8 or Better, Stud high/low No Qualifier, Super Stud 8 or Better, Razzdugi)

Each player in these games receives their own individual hand of (in most cases) seven cards. There is no flop of community cards. Players will play their own boards vs. their opponents, which will have a combination of hole and exposed cards.

Draw games (2-7 Triple Draw, A-5 Triple Draw, No Limit 2-7 Single Draw, 5-Card Draw, Badugi, Badacey, Baduecey, Archie)

Once again, there are no flops or community cards with these games. Rather, the main feature of these games is that on betting rounds, players have the option to discard from their hand and draw fresh cards in their attempt to make the best (or worst) hand.

The Cookbooks (study resources)

So where to start? You can either dive right in and find a live or online game (more on those in a bit), but if you want to get your feet wet with some study before you take the plunge, here are some outstanding resources to learn from.

Books

Mastering Mixed Games – Dylan Linde

If we could only recommend one resource for both beginners to mixed games and existing players looking to improve, it is Dylan Linde’s outstanding book. Linde provides both basic and advanced strategies for all games, including some of the more obscure ones you may only find in a live setting (Badeucey, Badacey). For under $40, The amount of information provided is invaluable.

A Poker Player’s Guide to Mixed Games – Ken Lo

This 2014 book may have flown under the radar, but it’s still available and an outstanding resource for both beginners and experienced players alike. It is incredibly thorough, going through the basics of each game before diving into deeper strategy. It’s a beefy book at almost 700 pages, but don’t let the size scare you. It’s well worth the read, and a great value also at under $40.

Super System 2 – Doyle Brunson + multiple authors

This book has multiple great chapters on mixed games. The original Super System does as well, but the information is now quite dated, while SS2 was written by more contemporary players (in 2005), such as Daniel Negreanu, Jennifer Harman and Todd Brunson, and still holds up very well. Their sections (Negreanu on 2-7 Triple Draw, Harman on Limit Hold ‘em, and Brunson on Stud 8 or better) we can still highly recommend.

Finding a material copy of SS2 can be a bit difficult, but the Kindle version is available on Amazon for under $10.

Seven Card Stud for Advanced Players – David Sklansky, Mason Malmuth, Ray Zee

High-Low Split Poker for Advanced Players – Ray Zee

These books fall solidly into the ‘classic’ category, as they were written in the 90s when Stud was as prominent if not more so than Hold ‘em.

As “for advanced players” is right in the title, we wouldn’t necessarily recommend these books as the first you read on Stud, Stud 8 and Omaha 8, but if you want to dig deeper and more thoroughly into these games, they’re definitely worth a look, and can by found through Amazon for under $40 each.

Online Training / Videos

Daniel Negreanu’s YouTube Mixed game series

Available at a cost of ZERO to your bankroll is Daniel Negreanu’s YouTube channel!

Specifically, Negreanu put together a series of short videos ideal for beginners to mixed games outlining rules and basic strategies for Limit Hold ‘em, Pot Limit Omaha, Omaha 8 or Better, Stud, Razz, Stud 8 or Better and 2-7 Triple Draw.

They’re a great starting point that will provide players with some solid fundamentals for the key games in an 8-game mix.

Run It Up WCOOP review with Jason Somerville and Daniel Negreanu

Kid Poker is part of another great free resource we highly recommend. In 2016, JCarver and DNegs sat down for a 4-hour video breakdown of Daniel’s WCOOP HORSE win.

It’s awesome to hear Negreanu go through his thought processes on the final table together with Somerville, and there are really no other places to get such a high level breakdown of mixed game hands in a hand history review format. It’s an entertaining and highly educational resource for those with even a fundamental knowledge of mixed games. 

Twitch streams

Twitch has become a hugely popular source of poker entertainment, and learning. While the biggest streamers are generally No Limit Hold ‘em players, there are some streamers on the platform whose main focus is playing and growing mixed games. At the top of the list is PokerStars Team Pro and founder of the ‘Mixed Game Movement’ Mason Pye (pyefacepoker). Pye recently won his first SCOOP title in 7-Card Stud and can regularly be found crushing the low- to mid-stakes mixed games on PokerStars.

ACR Stormer Scott Kenyon (Pokerbrahs) can also be found crushing the online mixed game streets, especially during the big series like WCOOP and SCOOP. A long-time mixed gamer, his live credentials include an EPT London 8-game title in 2011 for over $50,000.

Upswing Poker’s Mixed Game Mastery course

This option is at the pricier end of the spectrum, at $999, but it’s incredibly comprehensive and features 102 videos from highly successful mixed game player Jake Abdalla. The course focuses primarily on Stud, Stud 8, Razz, Omaha 8, and 2-7 Triple Draw.

That’s not the full gamut of mixed games, of course, but with 102 videos covering just those games, you’ll be provided more than enough information to be able to crush those poker variants and thus be able to treat the high price tag as an investment rather than an expense.

Dig In! (where to play)

So, you’re finally ready to play some poker variants with more than two cards in your hand. Congrats, and welcome to the wonderful world affectionately known as “banana games”!

Here’s a look at where to jump into the mixed game streets.

Live games

Mixed games are more popular in some areas than others, so check the Bravo Poker or Poker Atlas mobile apps, or call your local casino or poker room to see what’s available in your region.

One area that will always have regular mixed games of various stakes running is Las Vegas, especially during the World Series of Poker. Games do run year-round, but during the WSOP the offerings expand vastly!

This year, the WSOP has added a $250 H.O.R.S.E. tournament into their Daily Deepstacks weekly rotation to go along with the various mixed game bracelet events they stage.

The Orleans is a great spot for low-stakes cash and tournament mixed games year round, but during the WSOP they can be counted on for a great low-stakes tournament series with decent sized fields and prize pools for a small buy-in.

The Golden Nugget’s Grand Series is a fantastic spot for mixed game players as well, with a schedule generally echoing that of the WSOP, but for buy-ins roughly a tenth of the size.

Finally, during the WSOP the mixed game cash game streets tend to run wild at all stakes. You know those aforementioned legendary nights? Get ready to experience them firsthand at the Inaugural Cardplayer Lifestyle Mixed Game Festival, running from October 4-7 at the Westgate, and hosted by this site’s founder Robbie Strazynski. You won’t be sorry!

Online games

If you’re fortunate enough to live in a location with legal online poker, you have an outstanding resource to hone your mixed game chops.

PokerStars runs a full array of regularly scheduled daily mixed game tournaments with buy-ins as low as $1, and cash games with stakes as low as 1 cent / 2 cent, along with a full offering of play money games.

Other sites like GG Poker, partypoker and 888poker have more limited offerings including PLO, PLO8, Short Deck, Stud and Stud 8. PLO and Short Deck games will be largely available, but the others are tougher to find, with your best options being PLO8 tournaments on partypoker.

Rec Poker PokerStars Home Games

The crew at RecPoker are a great bunch of people, dedicated to growing poker for recreational players. They run a monthly mixed game tournament series with a leaderboard and player of the year award. To prepare for the monthly mixed game, each Saturday they’ll run a warmup game of whichever the game of the month is.

It’s a great way to play and learn with a group of friendly folks, and as it’s a free home game, can be played from anywhere in the world.

Final note: Be nice to the dealers!

You should always make the extra effort to be nice to the dealers when playing in mixed games. Dealer knowledge of mixed games can be limited depending on the venue. Please consider that a lot of dealers are unfamiliar with many games. Be patient and considerate with them and provide as much help as they need. You’ll see that with a little help, dealers will pick up the new games quite quickly. Lastly, of course, be sure to tip well and tip often!

Mark Seif talks about his 2021 back-to-back Venetian Deepstacks wins & his two WSOP wins in 2005

Mark Seif discusses contracting COVID-19 and also his future plans in poker

Mark Seif

In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee interviews Mark Seif, who recently captured two Deepstacks Championship Series Events in a week at the Venetian.

At the start of the interview, Mark talks about his tournament success this summer at the Venetian Deepstacks and his two previous WSOP bracelets in 2005. Mark discusses how his hyper-aggressive style was so advantageous in 2005, and how it has changed as he has to be careful in today’s poker world. Mark advises players to watch every hand and pay attention to every hand.  Then Mark talks about how to play a big chip stack and pay close attention to opponents’ chips stacks.

During the second part of the interview, Mark talks about stepping away from full-time tournament poker to be a dedicated father to his two daughters. Mark talks about the convenience of playing cash poker. He also discusses his excitement to play in the 2021 WSOP. Mark describes playing at the Venetian Deepstacks to prepare for the WSOP with no expectations. Unfortunately, Mark contracted COVID-19 in December 2020 and talks about his time in the hospital. Finally, Mark discusses his future plans for poker and travel.

0:00Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show as this week’s guest is Mark Seif, two-time WSOP bracelet & Venetian DeepStacks Championship Poker Series Winner.
1:59RunGood Gear Ad
2:42Bernard welcomes Mark Seif to the show.
4:01Mark joins the show and talks about his tournament success this summer at the Venetian Deepstacks.
6:48Mark talks about winning two WSOP bracelets within a week in 2005.
8:21Mark discusses how his hyper-aggressive style was so advantageous back in 2005, how it has changed and how he has to be careful in today’s poker world.
14:49Mark gives advice to watch every hand and pay attention to every hand.
21:10Mark talks about how to play a big chip stack and pay close attention to opponents’ chips stacks.
30:01Share My Pair Ad
30:34Bernard continues his interview with Mark Seif, two-time WSOP bracelet winner.
31:33Mark talks about stepping away from full-time tournament poker to be a dedicated father to his two daughters. He also talks about the convenience of playing cash poker over the years. He discusses his excitement to play in the 2021 WSOP.
37:50Mark recalls playing at the Venetian Deepstacks to prepare for the WSOP with no expectations.
41:10Mark talks about contracting COVID in December 2020 and spending time in the hospital.
45:55Mark explains that large poker tournaments like the WSOP still have weak spots and the importance of paying attention to opponent’s stack sizes. Also, Mark talks about the early levels decision making process in rebuy tournaments.
50:47Mark discusses his poker future and travel.

Mark Seif

 

The Festival, an all-encompassing gambling series, bringing together the excitement of live poker, casino games, and sports betting will be debuting in Bratislava’s Banco Casino from September 20 – 26. This unique series is the brainchild of one Martin “Franke” von Zweigbergk and was supposed to kick off in Tallinn, Estonia, earlier this year. The original plan fell through due to coronavirus restrictions.

With things now finally getting back to normal, The Festival will first be heading to Banco Casino. Bratislava is just the first of many cities that Martin has in his crosshairs. He has big plans for The Festival, and hopes he’ll be able to bring it to many different cities in the future.

Banco Casino Bratislava

Banco Casino Bratislava

What Is The Festival All About?

Live poker events are nothing new, but The Festival isn’t your traditional poker series. It will offer something for everyone. In addition to poker tournaments and cash games, The Festival will also feature competitive blackjack and roulette tournaments. All participants will also get to enjoy a variety of leisure activities.

The Festival Series is heading to Banco Casino Bratislava, a casino and city I now have visited more than 20 times. Each time I have discovered a new favorite restaurant or befriended a few more great people that love gaming as much as me. Now I will treat them with a treat.The Opening Event will be a Sviten Special Tournament, my new favorite poker game. There will also be a Blackjack and Roulette tournament. We are all in for a great week of action, both on and off the felt! – Martin “Franke” von Zweigbergk

The main idea behind The Festival is to bring people together for some quality entertainment. You don’t have to be a poker player to go and enjoy your time, as there are various other casino-related activities on offer:

So, no matter what type of gambling you might prefer, you’ll find something to keep you entertained during The Festival in Bratislava. Or, if you’re traveling with a non-poker playing friend or partner, there’ll be something for them to do while you’re grinding away on the felt.

The Festival Poker Series

Of course, if you’re reading this blog, you’re probably most interested in poker action. The good news is that there are several poker events taking place over the week, with some decent guarantees.

The €550 Main Event is the highlight of The Festival, featuring a €300,000 guarantee. There are three starting flights on September 21, 22, and 23, allowing up to two reentries per day. With a starting stack of 30,000 and 45-minute levels, this tournament promises some quality action. If Pot Limit Omaha is more your game, there is the €220 PLO Masters event taking place on September 21. Those with bigger bankrolls will have even more to do, as there are two high roller events, one for Hold’em and one for PLO, both featuring a €1,100 buy-in.

Other tournaments on The Festival schedule include:

But the real treat is definitely the Sviten Special event, although you’ll need to get to Bratislava on September 20 to play in this one. Sviten Special is a unique poker variant that represents a mix of PLO5 and five card draw, where the pot is split between the best PLO and the best five card draw hand. You even get to discard some cards and get new ones after the flop, so if you enjoy action, you’ll love this game.

The Festival

All in all, The Festival in Bratislava is an excellent choice if you’ve been missing the live action and want to get back into the mix of things. There is something for everyone there, the poker schedule is rich, and buy-ins are very reasonable, so it’s hard to think of a reason not to go!

Kevin Mathers discusses KevMath Reprt and WSOP COVID Vaccine Policy

Kevin Mathers

In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee interviews Kevin Mathers, who recently introduced the KevMath Report. Subscribe at Kevmath.substack.com.

Kevin talks about how he initially became involved in the world of poker and what his plans were after college. Kevin remembers how he used to gather poker information in the early days. Kevin then talks about tweeting during the WSOP and his typical day as WSOP Social Media Manager, including answering questions on Twitter. Kevin is amazed how long he has been on Twitter and is thankful to help so many poker players.

During the second half of the show, Kevin talks about why he decided to start the KevMath Report and reviews some topics of his first issue. To subscribe, visit Kevmath.substack.com. Kevin announces the plan is to release an issue of KevMath Report every Tuesday. Kevin discusses the new WSOP COVID-19 vaccine requirement announcement, and finally ends off with how excited he is about the 2021 WSOP.

0:00Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show as this week’s guest is Kevin Mathers, a.k.a., Kevmath, who is known as WSOP Czar and Founder of KevMath Report.
1:54Bernard announces $250 Labor Day Tournament at Boston Billiards Club & Casino (55 Northeastern Blvd, Nashua, NH) from September 3-6 with a noon start for all days. Three Day 1 flights from Sept 3-5 and Day 2 on September 6.
5:05RunGood Gear Ad
5:48Bernard welcomes Kevin Mathers to the show.
6:26Kevin joins the show and talks about how he initially became involved in the world of poker.
10:27Kevin recalls what his initial plans were after college and before poker.
13:43Kevin remembers how he used to gather poker information in the early days.
15:10Kevin talks about tweeting during the WSOP and his typical day as WSOP Social Media Manager, including answering questions on Twitter.
24:36Kevin discusses his days off, but how he is still technically working.
26:10Kevin is amazed how long he has been on Twitter and is thankful to have helped so many poker players.
27:43Share My Pair Ad
28:15Bernard continues his interview with Kevin Mathers, a.k.a., Kevmath, who is known as WSOP Czar and Founder of KevMath Report.
29:20Kevin talks about why he decided to start the KevMath Report and reviews some topics of his first issue.
37:28Kevin and Bernard talk about this coming weekend’s $250 Labor Day Tournament at Boston Billiards Club & Casino (55 Northeastern Blvd, Nashua, NH) from September 3-6 with a 12pm start for all days. Three Day 1 flights from Sept. 3-5 and Day 2 on September 6.
41:11To subscribe, visit Kevmath.substack.com.  Kevin announces the plan is to release an issue of KevMath Report every Tuesday.
44:00Kevin discusses the new WSOP COVID-19 vaccine requirement announcement.
51:00Kevin discusses how excited he is about the 2021 WSOP.

Kevin Mathers

Bryan Piccioli wins his second WSOP bracelet in the Wynn Casino parking lot!

Bryan Piccioli talks about his father who taught him poker, and his tragic accident in 2016.

Bryan Piccioli

In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee interviews Bryan Piccioli, who recently captured his second WSOP bracelet in the 2021 WSOP $500 Turbo Deepstack (Event #12).

At the start of the interview, Bryan talks about his recent successes online. In 2021 he earned a WSOP bracelet and Circuit ring after having had a marginal 2020 WSOP online series. Bryan talks about how this summer was different than last, since more players were in Las Vegas due to the resumption of live poker. He also  talks about why he was the first to know about the disqualification of Upeshka De Silva during the 2020 WSOP Main Event US bracket final table due to COVID. Bryan recalls winning his 2nd WSOP bracelet during the 2021 WSOP.com online series, which had an incredibly difficult final table, from the Wynn Casino parking lot.

During the second part of the interview, Bryan talks about his father, who introduced him to poker and  had a tragic accident in 2016. Bryan describes how Las Vegas was during the COVID pandemic in 2020. Finally, he discusses his future plans, including the upcoming birth of his first child.

0:00Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show as this week’s guest is Bryan Piccioli, two-time WSOP bracelet winner.
3:48RunGood Gear Ad
4:31Bernard welcomes Bryan Piccioli to the show.
5:38Bryan joins the show and talks about his recent success online, including a WSOP bracelet and Circuit ring after a marginal 2020 WSOP online series.
9:16Bryan talks about how this summer was different than last, since more players were in Las Vegas due to the resumption of live poker.
12:45Bryan discusses the influx of novice players playing the WSOP.com series in 2020.
15:37Bryan talks about why he was the first to know about the disqualification of Upeshka De Silva during the 2020 WSOP Main Event US bracket final table due to COVID.
21:17Bryan recalls winning his 2nd WSOP bracelet during the 2021 WSOP.com online series, which had an incredibly difficult final table, from the Wynn Casino parking lot.
26:29Bryan recalls the celebration at his home in Las Vegas and his parents home.
31:37Share My Pair Ad
32:09Learn WPT Ad
32:55Bernard continues his interview with Bryan Piccioli, two-time WSOP bracelet winner.
33:50Bryan talks about his father, who introduced him to poker, and unfortunately had a tragic accident in 2016.
41:05Bryan recalls how his father introduced him to poker.
46:31Bryan describes how Las Vegas was during the COVID pandemic in 2020.
48:57Bryan discusses his future plans, including the upcoming birth of his first child.

Bryan Piccioli

The game of poker is a miniature version – a microcosm – of life. We face all sorts of challenges during our lives, complicated by uncertainties and risks, and promises and rewards. They all have their counterparts in the game of poker. There are strong similarities, and here are seven of the most striking.

life and poker

Gambling

In life, when the rewards outweigh the risks, you are bound to succeed in the long run. That’s what the three laws of probability are all about. Likewise, in poker, with a drawing hand, whenever the pot odds are higher than the card odds against making your hand, you are favored to win that pot. Otherwise, you are gambling – and bound to be a loser in the long run.

Skill vs. Chance (Luck)

In poker, as in life, there are almost constant decisions to be made. If you have the skills to make the wisest decisions, you are bound to come out ahead for the most part. Trusting to luck – as in gambling, makes you an underdog. Interestingly, the skill vs. luck issue is something that was hotly debated among officials when determining legal gambling regulations in Pennsylvania and other states. Here’s where you can read more about that.

Return-on-Investment for a Positive Expectation

You have a Positive Expectation when your investment (bet) earns a profit over the long run. That is essential to success in both life and poker.

life is just one long poker game. We’re all just trying to make positive EV plays while occasionally bluffing

— Froste 💯 (@Froste) July 21, 2020

Education for greater skills

In both poker and life, you have some control over your education. Learn what you can to best develop your skills – be it in the office where you work or at the poker table. One great place to start is at some of the best poker training sites.

Starting hand selection

In playing poker, the most critical decision is selecting the starting hands before investing your precious chips in the pot. Most players are anxious to get involved – too anxious. As a result, they are prone to play weak hands which generally lead to losing their chips. The smart player, the well-skilled player, is more discerning and cautious. To be best prepared, you can use the Hold’em Algorithm or available charts to facilitate and make your best decision. Losers depend more on luck. So it is in life: wisely invest your time and money.

Grow your winnings

Playing poker, you can build the size of the pots you win. It takes skill to do so. Toward that end, there are tactics you can use – slow-play, check-and-raise, and bet for value, among others. In a similar manner, you can find ways to outdo your competition as you build your career – get that promotion and salary increase or earn a bonus. Be prepared and plan ahead. Seek favorable opportunities.

Know your competition

Study your competition be it in life or at the poker table. Observe the types of players you are up against – tight, loose, passive, aggressive or deceptive. Learn to read their hands and their tells. Then you can make the wisest decisions in your favor. In life, your career success may depend on it.

Indeed, the game of poker is a microcosm of life. Be a winner at both for a happier life.

George Epstein ad

Joe recalls 2020 WSOP Main Event US Bracket and how he avoided contracting COVID

Joe Hebert talks about the target on his back since he won the 2020 WSOP US Bracket Main Event

Joe Hebert

In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee interviews Joe Hebert, who recently captured the 2nd Annual Gulf Poker Award’s Player of the Year (POY). Last year, Joe captured the hearts of poker players by winning the 2020 WSOP US Bracket Main Event for his late mother (#ForLinda). After being named Gulf Coast Poker POY, Joe also won the 2021 Poker Gras Main Event.

At the start of the interview, Joe talks about his late mother looking down on him during the 2020 WSOP Main Event US Domestic bracket and the 2021 Poker Gras Main Event (#ForLinda). Joe talks about how the 2nd Annual Gulf Coast Poker Awards were presented at Harrah’s New Orleans during the 2021 Poker Gras Main Event. Next, Joe discusses the current COVID-19 pandemic situation in Louisiana and his potential plans for the WSOP in Las Vegas. Joe recalls the 2020 WSOP US Bracket Main Event, including the disqualification of Upeshka De Silva during the final table due to COVID. Also, Joe talks about his father contracting COVID-19, and how Joe himself fortunately avoided contracting it. Joe talks about being recognized after his victory, especially in Mexico. He also describes his picture on the wall at Harrah’s New Orleans.

During the second part of the interview, Joe talks about winning the 2nd Annual Gulf Coast Poker Award – Player of the Year and playing in the 2021 Poker Gras Main Event. Joe discusses the target on his back, and how players are now playing differently against him. Finally, Joe discusses his future poker plans.

0:00Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show as this week’s guest is 2nd Annual Gulf Coast Poker Award – Player of the Year, Joe Hebert.
1:28The WSOP continues its summer online bracelet tournaments in Pennsylvania and outside of the US on GGPoker.com. Also, the WSOP sends out information about its COVID-19 policy for WSOP Las Vegas in October 2021.
7:32RunGood Gear Ad
8:15Bernard welcomes Joe Hebert to the show.
9:31Joe joins the show and talks about his late mother looking down on him during the 2020 WSOP Main Event US Domestic bracket and the 2021 Poker Gras Main Event. #ForLinda
12:47Joe talks about how the 2nd Annual Gulf Coast Poker Awards were presented at Harrah’s New Orleans during the 2021 Poker Gras Main Event.
15:34Joe discusses the current COVID-19 pandemic situation in Louisiana and his potential plans for WSOP in Las Vegas.
19:35Joe recalls the overall tournament of the 2020 WSOP US Bracket Main Event, including the disqualification of Upeshka De Silva during the final table due to COVID. Also, Joe talks about his father contracting COVID and how Joe fortunately avoided contracting it.
27:38Joe talks about being recognized after his victory, especially in Mexico.
29:36Joe explains the picture of him on the wall at Harrah’s New Orleans.
31:48Share My Pair Ad
32:20Bernard continues his interview with Joe Hebert, who won the 2021 Poker Gras Main Event.
33:22Joe talks about winning the 2nd Annual Gulf Coast Poker Award – Player of the Year, and playing in the 2021 Poker Gras Main Event.
36:56Joe discusses the new target on his back and how players are now playing differently against him since his 2020 WSOP US Bracket Main Event victory.
39:41Joe talks about the 2021 Poker Gras Main Event.
44:31Joe discusses his future poker plans.

Joe Hebert

Preston McEwen talks about winning $44,320 in Little Kings and Queens main event

How Preston McEwen goes from musician to pro poker player/RunGoodGear Ambassador

Preston McEwen

In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee interviews Preston McEwen, who recently became the 2nd Annual Gulf Poker Award’s Breakout Player of the Year. Preston has been playing great poker throughout the year, including winning the Little Kings and Queens main event, taking home $44,320. Held at Little Kings and Queens in Buford, GA, the $630 main event had 363 entries, and a a prize pool of $196,020.

At the start of the interview, Preston talks about how he got started in poker world, after his initial focus on music. The RunGood Gear ambassador recalls how he first became an ambassador for the company. Preston describes his cash in the 2019 WSOP Main Event and the uniqueness of the annual tournament. Preston talks about how COVID affected his poker life, as he started grinding more online and private games.

During the second part of the interview, Preston talks about his victory in the 2021 Little Kings and Queens main event. He explains how he fired two bullets in different flights and describes a huge double late in Flight B. He also talks about how he adjusted to some of the recreational players in the field, taking more hands post-flop. Preston discusses his own Steel Wheel Poker League and his plans for the rest of 2021, including the WSOP and RunGoodPoker Series.

0:00Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show, as this week’s guest is the 2nd Annual Gulf Coast Poker Award – Breakout Player of the Year, Preston McEwen.
1:31Bernard announces the winners of the 2021 2nd Annual Gulf Coast Poker Awards, including our guest this week and future guest, 2020 WSOP Main Event Domestic bracket winner, Joe Hebert.
6:54RunGood Gear Ad
7:37Bernard welcomes Preston McEwen to the show.
8:29Preston joins the show and talks about the Little Kings and Queens main event, which he won for $44,320, and the Georgia charitable poker landscape
10:03Preston talks about how he got started in the poker world, but originally was focused on music.
12:52Preston recalls how he became an ambassador for RunGoodGear.com.
16:22Preston describes his cash in the 2019 WSOP Main Event and the uniqueness of the annual tournament.
23:13Preston talks about how COVID affected his poker life, as he started grinding more online and private games.
29:14Share My Pair Ad
29:36Bernard continues his interview with Preston McEwen, 2021 Little Kings and Queens main event champion.
30:57Preston talks about the poker landscape in Georgia.
32:07Preston recalls how the 2021 Little Kings and Queens main event started. He talks about firing two bullets in different flights. He also describes a huge double late in Flight B.
36:20Preston talks about how he adjusted to some of the recreational players in the field, taking more hands post-flop.
41:22Preston discusses his own Steel Wheel Poker League.
44:37Preston talks about his plans for the rest of 2021, including the WSOP and RunGoodPoker Series.

 

Preston McEwen

David Peters & Chris Moorman

In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee interviews two recent WSOP.com bracelet winners who were both previous guests on the show: David Peters and Chris Moorman.

In the first half of the show, Bernard interviews David Peters, who recently captured his third WSOP bracelet, winning the $7,777 No-limit High Roller event. The event had 151 entries and David took home $283,940. After David talks about the different dynamics of online vs. live poker, he discusses making the final table in the $3,200 High Roller bracelet event, and the excitement of the poker community. David also talks about future poker plans, both live (including Florida, Cyprus, Poker Masters) and online (GGPoker.com).

In the second half of the show, Bernard interviews Chris Moorman, who recently captured his second WSOP bracelet, winning the $800 no-limit 8-max turbo event. The event featured 623 entries and Chris took home $102,406. After recalling the event, Chris talks about the different kinds of luck in poker. He also talks about his future plans, including playing GGPoker.com and the 2021 WSOP at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino.

0:00Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show. This week’s guests are recent 2021 WSOP.com Bracelet winners: David Peters and Chris Moorman.
0:41Bernard announces several winners of the 2021 WSOP Online Series and talks about the events that will continue on GGPoker.com.
7:22RunGood Gear Ad
8:05Bernard welcomes David Peters to the show.
9:24David joins the show.
10:53David describes the event and looks up player’s online names including the final table.
13:11David talks about playing for bracelets online at WSOP.com.
14:25David recalls heads-up play during the recent $7,777 no-limit bracelet win.
15:49David talks about the different dynamics of online poker and live poker.
18:35David recalls making the final table in the $3,200 High Roller bracelet event immediately after, and the excitement of the poker community.
20:33David talks about future playing plans, both live (including Florida, Cyprus, Poker Masters) and online (GGPoker.com).
24:50David explains why he enjoys playing in the PokerGO studio.
27:26David discusses playing and winning WSOP bracelets and specific events he plans to play in the 2021 WSOP at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino.
31:30Share My Pair Ad
32:02Bernard welcomes Chris Moorman to the show.
32:46Chris joins the show and talks about winning his recent turbo WSOP event and his live win in 6-max.
39:50Chris states that it is still important to cash even in small buy-in events.
41:04Chris reveals how he knows these players online.
44:48Chris discusses the final table of the WSOP.com event that he recently won, where he entered the final table as the chip leader.
49:29Chris talks about different kinds of luck in poker.
50:35Chris talks about his future plans in the next few months, including GGPoker and 2021 WSOP at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino.

 

Bernard Lee Poker Show

David Peters

In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee conducts the first part of his interview with the 2021 U.S. Poker Open (USPO) Champion, David Peters. Originally from Ohio, now living in Las Vegas, Peters has now won back-to-back Golden Eagle Trophies as he also won the 2019 USPO, which were both held at the PokerGO Studio, just outside the Aria Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Note: 2020 USPO was cancelled due to COVID19 pandemic.)

David discusses that he initially got interested in poker, live and online. He recalls two momentous times during the past decade: Black Friday and COVID-19 pandemic, and how he handled them. The pandemic was not all bad for David, as he spent it in Mexico and also captured his 2nd WSOP bracelet.

Today, David talks about studying with poker programs and simulations to keep his game sharp. He also provides advice to rising poker players on how to improve their game.

Next week, in part 2 of my interview, David talks about the 2019 and 2021 U.S. Poker Open (USPO) and future goals.

0:00Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show as this week’s guest is 2021 U.S. Poker Open (USPO) Champion, David Peters.
1:312021 WSOP events have been released. The 88 bracelets will be played at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino from September 30 through November 23.
4:04Triton Poker Tables Ad
5:01Bernard welcomes David Peters to the show.
6:33David joins the show.
8:05David talks about how he started playing poker as he watched poker on TV, played with friends and family at home and learned to play online.
10:48David discusses that he initially got interested with the 2002 WSOP Main Event when Robert Varkonyi captured the title.
12:42David discusses how he initially improved his game and determined his playing schedule.
15:10David ranks his top three locations to play poker across the world.
17:34David recalls how he reacted and dealt with the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic including relocating to Mexico for over a year.
23:24David decides to come back to U.S. to play in the 2021 USPO.
24:25David recalls his online poker schedule in Mexico during the COVID-19 pandemic, including winning his 2nd WSOP bracelet ($10,000 Heads-Up Championship on GGPoker.com).
27:18RunGood Gear Ad
28:01Bernard continues his interview with 2021 U.S. Poker Open (USPO) Champion, David Peters.
29:48David remembers how Black Friday affected his poker career, which led to a boost in his live play.
32:06David discusses the moment where he decided to play in the high roller events.
34:24David talks about studying with poker programs and simulations to keep his game sharp.
39:50David emphasizes adjusting to your table and exploiting them based on the opponents’ experience.
46:45David provides advice for poker players to improve their game, including understanding the variance in poker.

David Peters